Neuter and Spay

Why neuter or spay?

As a pet owner, spaying or neutering is an important part of your pets healthcare if you aren’t planning on breeding your dogs or cats. This is not only helpful in avoiding unpredictable litters it also reduces aggression, several fatal diseases and often leads to a quieter calmer pet as they age (It won’t reduce your puppies love of tearing around the house).

For female dogs or cats, spaying (ovariohysterectomy), is the surgical removal of the uterus and ovaries. Hence, the dog or cat will not be at risk of having pyometra (a uterine infection resulting in pus accumulation in the uterus, which can be fatal), and at very low risk of developing a mammary gland tumor, which even with surgery has an unpredictable outcome. To reduce the risk of a mammary gland tumor, ideally the surgery should be done before your pet’s first heat (estrus). If the surgery is done after the 4th heating, the effectiveness of disease prevention is greatly reduced.

For male dogs or cats, neutering (castration) will help to reduce the risk some diseases that the male hormone (Testosterone) is responsible for such as; prostate tumor, prostatitis or Perianal tumors. For dogs with retained testicles (Cryptorchidism), neutering will be more important, because they are in high risk to develop Sertoli cell tumor or Seminomas.

To find out more about the procedures and their advantages or to book an appointment give us a call at 780 406 0811.

 

When Should you Neuter or Spay?

We recommend getting a dog or cat neutered or spayed around 6 months old. Procedures should not be done too early in the animal’s life as they need hormones for proper growth and development. Premature neutering and spaying can inhibit growth. If the surgery is done too late, the risk of hormone induced disease increases.

Prepping and Caring For Your Pet Before and After Surgery

 

The Day Before:

When you make an appointment the Veterinary Assistant on the telephone can answer any questions or concerns and provide you with a quote. We need your help to fast your pets for 12 hours before dropping them off the morning of the surgery.

 

The Day Of:

You can drop off your pet at 9:00 am for surgery and help us to complete some paper work, giving your permission to allow us to perform the procedure. If for some reason you are unable to drop your pet off at 9:00 am the day of, you are able to drop them off before 8:00pm the night before and we can keep them overnight at no extra charge. You can pick up your pet in late afternoon or evening on the same day. However, for female dogs, we prefer to keep them overnight after surgery, so that their activities are confined properly during the first 24 hours following surgery, at no extra charge.

 

The Days After:

Neuter or spay surgeries are sterile surgeries, which means that no antibiotics are sent home with your pet. To reduce pain induced stress and keep your pet comfortable after surgery, we will send home 3 days’ worth of pain control medication. (This is included in your Spay or Neuter payment and will come at no extra charge).

After surgery, your pet will be drowsy for the rest of the evening. Please keep them away from stairs and tall beds for their safety. You may offer them a small amount of food and water when you arrive home.

You will want to keep your pet calm and inactive for up to 10 days after the surgery to allow the incision to heal completely. You may take him for a walk but please restrict or eliminate rough play with others. The incision should be checked every day for swelling, redness or tenderness. If you see any of these feel free to give us a call. The incision must also stay dry; if it does get wet you may pat it dry with a clean cloth. Please do not scrub. We also need to help to prevent your pets from licking the incision. If they do lick, please put a cone on while they are not under supervision until the incision heals.

Most dogs and cats feel completely fine by the next day but we will be sure to give you a call a couple days after your surgery to make sure all is going well.